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Location Facts & Getting to Know Your Suburb

Locations Sydney CBD Camperdown Leichhardt Glebe Surry Hills Paddington Darlinghurst Balmain North Sydney Neutral Bay Cremorne Mosman North Ryde Castle Hill Homebush Bay Parramatta Pyrmont Sydney CBD Ultimo Redfern Randwick

 

Balmain, which is located on the Balmain peninsula just west of Sydney's CBD, was originally given as payment to William Balmain in 1800. Balmain, who was NSW's principal surgeon and First Fleet surgeon, sold the property off just one year later, and all 550 acres were eventually subdivided into separate parcels. By the 1850s, Balmain had become a growing suburb largely occupied by ship builders, sailors and other ship workers. As the population... read more

 

Just 4 kilometres southwest of Sydney's CBD is the small inner-city suburb of Camperdown. Crisscrossed with dedicated cycle ways and pedestrian walkways, Camperdown is a quiet, studious suburb with a relaxed feel. Visitors to Camperdown today can stroll or bike through the suburb, explore indie clothing label stores, pop in to decorative art stores or check out the variety of thrift stores and secondhand clothing... read more

 

The Castle Hills area of New South Wales has been inhabited for more than 40,000 years. The Darug tribe, a nomadic group of Aboriginals, first occupied the area and maintained camps in the caves and alongside the waterways. They traded tools and other necessities with other area tribes. The women gathered figs, grapes and tubers while the men hunted and fished. After the arrival of the First Fleet, smallpox killed a large number ... read more

 

Sydney has more than 650 suburbs and localities and 38 unique government areas. Each suburb and locality has its own character, flair, history and attractions. The culture and people of Sydney are as diverse as its suburbs. Visitors to Sydney can benefit from exploring one or many of these neighbourhoods or immersing themselves in them by choosing accommodations in a particular neighbourhood so that they can better appreciate ... read more

 

Just east of Sydney lies Darlinghurst, which is nestled amongst Kings Cross, Surry Hills and Woolloomooloo. Traditionally inhabited by the Gadigal people, the area that is now known as Darlinghurst was first called Wolloomooloo Heights thanks to its prime location overlooking the valley. In the 1820s, Governor Ralph Darling began to construct villas along the ridge line. He issued a total of 17 land grants to some of the area’s ... read more

 

Just three kilometres southwest of Sydney's CBD, quiet Glebe is one of Sydney's charming inner city suburbs, nestled between universities and with its leafy lanes lined by Victorian terraces and modest cottages, Glebe has a lively bohemian vibe that is simply unequalled. Several well-known Australians hail from Glebe, including Australia's first Prime Minister Sir Edmund Barton, comedian Charles Firth of "The Chaser's War on Everything" and architect... read more

 

The Homebush area was originally occupied by the Eora and the Dharawal people who lived in the eucalyptus forests and wetlands that stretch along what are now known as Haslams and Powells creeks and on the shores of Homebush Bay. In the 1800s, assistant surgeon D'arcy Wentworth established the Homebush colony, purportedly named for his home in the bush. Homebush Bay, which includes both commercial... read more

 

The traditional owners of Leichhardt are the Cadigal people and the Wangal people. It is believed that they inhabited the area from South Head to Petersham and stretching along the southern shore of the Parramatta River from Petersham to Rosehill. The Aboriginal populations inhabited this area for an estimated 10,000 years before the arrival of Europeans. Explorer Ludwig Leichhardt was given the honour of having this newly colonized... read more

 

Mosman, which is located on Sydney’s lower north shore about 8 kilometres northeast of the CBD, was originally occupied by the Borogegal tribe. Many of the Borogegal people died shortly after the Europeans began to settle in the area and brought with them smallpox and other diseases against which the Aboriginal people had no natural immunity. The site, which is now known as Mosman Bay, was determined to be an ideal... read more

 

The traditional home of the Cammeraygal people, Neutral Bay today is a diverse neighbourhood filled with high-rises, townhouses and quiet bungalows. Located about five kilometres north of Sydney’s central business district, Neutral Bay is surrounded by Cremorne, Cremorne Point, North Sydney and Cammeray. Europeans named the area Neutral Bay in 1789 when Governor Phillip determined that all foreign, or non-British, ships should... read more

 

The city of Ryde was first inhabited by the Wallumedegal Aboriginal people. They called it Wallumattagal, which is derived from the word for snapper fish combined with matta, which means “place” or “water place”. The initial encounters between the Europeans, who arrived in 1788, and the Aboriginals were civil, but as the Europeans began to build forts and settle the areas around Sydney Harbour, the Aboriginals were pushed out of their... read more

 

North Sydney is surrounded by Lavender Bay, Kirribilli, Crows Nest, Milsons Point and Neutral Bay. It is known for having one of the largest CBDs in the country, which serves the entire Sydney region. The North Sydney CBD contains numerous landmarks, including the Stanton Library and the Independent Museum. Located on the traditional land of the Cammeraygal people, the area began to be settled in the early 1800s when... read more

 

The eastern suburb of Paddington, New South Wales, is located just three kilometres east of Sydney’s central business district. It is bordered by Darlinghurst, Edgecliff and Kings Cross. Although a vibrant suburb of one of Australia’s most brilliant cities, Paddington was once a swampy patch of land with sand hills and boulders scattered across its barren landscape. The Cadigal people made the area now known as Paddington their... read more

 

When the First Fleet Arrived at Sydney Cove, their food stores were limited and certainly insufficient for the settlers and convicts who had just arrived. The newcomers experienced difficulty farming the sandy soil in the unfamiliar climate, so Governor Arthur Philip surveyed the land along the Parramatta River to farm and settle because the freshwater made the area more inhabitable, and the soil was less sandy there, which made it easier... read more

 

The inner-city suburb of Pyrmont is located just two kilometres from Sydney’s CBD. It was not well developed until the mid-19th century, however. The early Aboriginal inhabitants of the area included the Gadigal people as well as another clan that has not yet been officially recognised. The European settlers christened the area Pyrmont after a town in Germany known for its spa. The pretty setting and its natural spring later named... read more

 

Named after Randwick in Gloucestershire, England, Randwick, NSW, is just 6 kilometers southeast of Sydney’s CBD. The area was heavily populated by Aboriginal people at the time of the First Fleet’s arrival. An estimated 1,500 people who were part of the Eora nation were believed to have lived in the area between Botany Bay and Broken Bay. Starvation and smallpox wiped out many of the Indigenous people, and the few who... read more

 

Named after Randwick in Gloucestershire, England, Randwick, NSW, is just 6 kilometers southeast of Sydney’s CBD. The area was heavily populated by Aboriginal people at the time of the First Fleet’s arrival. An estimated 1,500 people who were part of the Eora nation were believed to have lived in the area between Botany Bay and Broken Bay. Starvation and smallpox wiped out many of the Indigenous people, and the few who... read more

 

The story of Surry Hills begins shortly after the First Fleet arrived in Sydney Cove. As the convicts and sailors began to settle into the area around The Rocks, the wealthier settlers spread out into the surrounding areas, including Surry Hills. Farming and feeding the animals was a primary concern for the new arrivals in Sydney. Unfortunately, the unfamiliar land proved difficult to farm, and the clay ground was hard when dry and sticky... read more

 

An alpha world city, a global player and Australia’s largest and best-known city, Sydney has come a long way from a disreputable penal colony to the vibrant, culturally diverse place it is today. Indigenous people once lived throughout the area and fished the waters of the harbour, but the arrival of the First Fleet brought great suffering for both the Aboriginal people and the Europeans. The Europeans struggled to farm and acquire land... read more

 

No trip to Sydney, Australia, would be complete without a visit to the inner city suburb of Ultimo. Ultimo has a rich history and unique cultural flavour that has been transformed and redefined throughout the years. Visitors can enjoy the upscale modern amenities of this suburb that still carries traces of its past as a rough industrial centre. By the time it was officially incorporated in 1842, Ultimo had already experienced 40 years of history... read more

 

The horseshoe-shaped valley that is located just east of Sydney and stretches from William Street to the Harbour is known as Woolloomooloo. Once a swampy hunting ground for the Gadigal people, Woolloomooloo was not one of Sydney’s most desirable early settlements. Although the valley was eventually drained, which left mudflats in the wake of the swamps, the area was still largely impassable... read more